​​​​​​​​214-838-3210

​​​​​​​214-838-3210


Sealants: 
After sealants have been placed, your child may say it “feels different when they bite down.”  This is expected after sealant placement.  After 1-2 days of eating, the excess sealant material will wear away, and your child’s bite will feel normal again.  To help ensure longevity of the sealant, avoid chewing ice and hard foods (I.e. suckers).  Sugarless gum is acceptable.  The sealant will help protect the chewing surface of the tooth, but good brushing and flossing is needed to protect the sides of and in between the teeth. 

Local Anesthetic: 

Typically, the numb feeling from local anesthetics may last 1-3 hours after treatment.  This can affect the cheeks, lips, and tongue, depending on where the local anesthetic was administered.  The numbness may be an unusual sensation for a child, so care and monitoring must be taken so that your child does not bite, chew or excessively push/pinch his/her cheek, lips, or tongue.  Please keep your child on a liquid diet and avoid eating until the anesthetic has worn off.  

Composite Resin Fillings (White Fillings): 
After restoring a tooth with a resin filling, it is not uncommon to have some tooth and gum sensitivity post-operatively.   
Tooth sensitivity is more common in permanent teeth versus baby teeth.  However, this sensitivity will usually subside after a few weeks.  The severity of the dental decay and the body's reaction to the bacterial insult could potentially cause the tooth to become symptomatic (discomfort) and or/abscess (infection). If an abscess develops on a baby tooth, the tooth will need to be extracted.  If the infection occurs on a permanent tooth, it may require a root canal.    Maintaining good oral hygiene (brushing and flossing) as well as limiting sugars in your diet will protect the tooth from developing further decay around the filling. 
The gums around the filled tooth might be slightly irritated as well.  Take the recommended dosage of Tylenol or Advil to minimize this discomfort.   
 
Pulpotomy:   
After treatment with a pulpotomy on a baby tooth, some minor soreness may occur.  Take the recommended dosage of Advil or Tylenol (if not allergic) to minimize this discomfort.  The success of a pulpotomy (removal of a portion of the affected nerve) depends on the severity of the dental decay and the body's reaction to the bacterial insult and pulp treatment.  Literature states that a small percentage of teeth will abscess after treatment with a crown and/or pulpotomy.  An abscess is an infection that occurs around the root of a tooth.  An abscessed tooth may present with or without pain, and with or without swelling of the gum tissue around the tooth. If an abscess occurs, please return to our office, as the baby tooth will require extraction.  It is recommended that regular six (6) month check-ups be maintained in order to evaluate the tooth.   
 
Crown:  
Avoid eating for the first hour to allow the cement to fully set and help minimize the chance of the crown coming off.  After treatment with a crown, some minor soreness may occur, especially around the gums.  Take the recommended dosage of Advil or Tylenol (if not allergic) to alleviate this discomfort.  Literature states that a small percentage of teeth may abscess even after treatment with a crown due to the bacterial insult on the tooth.  An abscess is an infection that occurs around the root of a tooth.  An abscessed tooth may present with or without pain, and with or without swelling of the gum tissue around the tooth. If an abscess occurs, please return to our office for evaluation and treatment options.  It is recommended that regular six (6) month check-ups be maintained in order to evaluate the tooth.   It is not uncommon for a crown to come loose off of a tooth.  If this should occur, please return to our office so that the crown can be recemented.   Avoiding sticky foods and candies will help prevent the crown from coming loose.    

Extractions: 

  • Numbness – the mouth will be numb for 1-3 hours.  Monitor your child that he/she does not bite, scratch, or injure the lips, cheek, or tongue during this time.  
  • Bleeding - bleeding was controlled before we discharged your child, but some occasional oozing (pink or blood tinged saliva) may occur. Hold gauze with firm pressure against the surgical site until oozing has stopped. You may need to change the gauze or repeat this step. If bleeding continues for more than two hours, contact us.  
  • Surgical Site Care- Today, do not disturb the surgical site. Do not stretch the lip, or cheeks to look at the area, do not rinse vigorously, use mouthwash, or probe the area with fingers or other objects. Beginning tomorrow, you may rinse with warm salt water (1.2 teaspoon salt with one cup water) after meals (if the patient has the ability to rinse and spit).   
  • Sutures- Sutures (stitches) may have been placed to help control bleeding and promote healing. These sutures will dissolve and do not need to be removed OR will be removed at your follow-up visit. If the stitches come out during the first 48 hours, contact our office.  
  • Daily Activities- Today, avoid physical exercise and exertion. Return to normal activities as tolerated. Smoking is never recommended for one’s health and may delay healing following oral surgery.  
  • Diet-After all bleeding has stopped, the patient may drink cool non-carbonated liquids but should NOT use a straw. Encourage fluids to help avoid dehydration. Cold soft foods (e.g. ice cream, gelatin, pudding, yogurt) are ideal the first day. By the second day, consistency of foods can progress as tolerated. Until healing is more established, avoid foods such as potato chips, nuts, sunflower seeds, and popcorn that may get lodged in the surgical areas.  
  • Oral hygiene- Keeping the mouth clean is essential. Today, teeth may be brushed and flossed gently, but avoid stimulating the surgical site. Soreness and swelling may not permit vigorous brushing of all areas, but please make every effort to clean the teeth within the bounds of comfort.   
  • Pain- Because some discomfort is expected, you may give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) before the numbness wears off. DO NOT give aspirin to your child. Follow the instructions on the bottle for dosing based upon your child’s weight and age.   
  • Swelling- Slight swelling and inflammation may occur for the next few days.  If swelling occurs, ice packs may be used for the first 24 hours (10 minutes on then 10 minutes off) to decrease swelling and/or bruising. If swelling persists after 24 hours, warm/moist compress (10 minutes on then 10 minutes off) may help. If swelling occurs after 48 hours, call our office. 
  • Fever- A slight fever (temperature 100.5 F) is not uncommon the first 48 hours after surgery. If a higher fever develops or the fever persists, call our office.  
  • Dry Socket- Premature dissolving or loss of a blood clot following removal of a permanent tooth may result in a “dry socket.”  This typically occurs on the third to fifth day after the   extraction, with a persistent throbbing pain in the jaw.   Call our office if this presents.  A dry socket rarely occurs with a baby tooth extraction.



Office: 214-838-3210.  
After hours: 214-838-3210.  The office line will forward to the doctor’s cell phone.  Please leave a voicemail and your call will be returned.  Every effort will be made for a timely return call.  
Emergency: 911 

Dental Post-Op Instructions